Five things that parents need you to say

There are memory moments you take out, hold up to the light and bask in for a minute or two.  They give you a little spark of brightness, a lift or bump of energy.  Those are moments you hoard and take out sparingly because you know you’ll need them again.  You don’t want them to lose their impact.

When my son was nine, I had such a moment.  It was a particularly tough time when nothing was going right.  He was diagnosed with depression but the succession of medications made him wired, rarely sleeping, acting on nearly every impulse that crossed his mind.  I was taught behavioral strategies which were pretty worthless and the word “no” reliably caused meltdowns or worse behavior. I was tired, discouraged, often near tears and holding on with a grit-my-teeth determination.

During an appointment with his psychiatrist, my son flipped through every mood, touched everything in the office and was headed for a major outburst.  I don’t remember what I did – talking, rubbing his shoulder, bribing or distracting but it worked for a few minutes.  The doctor looked at him, then at me.  He said, “You two are a very good fit.  Your son is lucky to have you.”

I replayed those words over and over again that day and would take that moment and those words out and relive them over the years.  I never doubted them and felt more confident.  They always lessened my discouragement (at least a little) and became a kind of touchstone.  Every parent raising a child with emotional, behavioral and mental health needs simply should have one of those moments.  Two or three, or even more would be even better.

Many appointments are focused only the child or youth and have little time for conversation, except for giving directions for follow up.  Sometimes parents call, email, facebook or contact someone for help and the entire exchange is focused on problem solving.  We are all thinking about the needs of the child, not the parent.  We give lip service to the notion that a parent is the most important part of a child’s life, but that’s about all.

Parents raising children and youth with mental health needs have learned to take a smidge of encouragement and run with it.  It’s usually in short supply.  Whenever there is a chance, it’s important for all of us to hear these five things.

1.  Your child is lucky to have you. Parents hang in there and do the best they can. We are blamed, judged and excluded regularly and many times don’t feel lucky at all.  Our efforts go unnoticed though we are the ones dealing with the aftermath of the latest meltdown or shopping for a rigid eater or anticipating the next crisis.  Without our advocacy for services and school supports or our willingness to live one day or one hour at a time, things would be a lot worse.  It’s really nice when someone notices that.

2. It’s not you, it’s the system. Our children don’t get approved for services or we have no idea what’s available.  A program or treatment is stopped too soon or we wait for it forever.  We do our damnedest to parent well, to keep our child on an even keel and then the system simply doesn’t work the way we are told it’s supposed to.  It feels personal.  It’s nice to hear it’s not.

3. I like the way you said that. Parents often have a unique way of looking at things and they coin their own phrases or create funny names for things.  My son and I made up names for our pointer dog and she was the stand in for a lot of family jokes.  Parents shouldn’t need to learn jargon or acronyms (though most of us do) and we often use words that make things sound less intimidating.  Instead of talking around us or “above” us, appreciating our point of view is worth a lot.

4. You’re doing everything right, even if you’re not seeing the results. Thomas Edison, they say, failed 1,000 times before creating a successful light bulb. All the diets, discipline and many treatments we try often don’t work.  We take the blame on ourselves too often or wish we were better at this. We are often doing it right but the results don’t point that way.  It’s nice to hear it said out loud once in a while.

5. You’re doing a good job. It’s a tough job, raising a child with emotional or behavioral issues. People are quick to judge (why can’t you control him?) or offer platitudes (it’s only a phase).  There is still a lot of stigma out there around mental health issues and many parents feel it’s not getting any better.  Even professionals who say they are strengths based in their approach only offer suggestions or new things to try without taking the time to notice our good work and herculean effort here and now.

Parents are great at detecting what’s authentic and what’s not.  One of the reasons it meant so much when my son’s psychiatrist said he was lucky was because he truly meant it.  If you say one (or more) of the five things, you’d better really believe it .  On the other hand, if you truly mean it, it might be one of those moments a parent like me takes out when the going gets tough to cherish and make their day a better one.

 

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2 thoughts on “Five things that parents need you to say

  1. Thank you. This post meant so much to me. I have 3 children, all with mental health, behavioral and developmental challenges. Back when I had only 2, and was struggling *hard* with my middle child, my own therapist said something to me that is just as you describe: a touchstone. Something I take out to warm and sustain myself when I forget, or start to doubt myself as a parent. When I lose my mojo, and forget the progress we’ve made, I remember the day my therapist responded to my tearful (and rhetorical) “Why? Why am I their mother, when I am failing at it? Why does everyone else have it easier?!” Because, we’ve all had those self-pity moments. When we hear a fellow mom moan about something like her schedule shuttling her kids from one sport to another typical activity. And we think: I wish that was my biggest worry. And, of course, that’s not her biggest worry. But anyway, that day, my therapist told me that, in her belief system (and she doesn’t normally share those things with patients), she feels that my kids came to me, specifically, because they needed me as a mother, with all my faults and strengths, because they lend me insights, and those help me help my kids.. I was shaped for them, suited to their needs. That day, what she said settled me into my role. It was a deep breath for me. And now, whenever I get an eye-roll from some educational professional or doctor who is tired of my “mom wisdom”, how well I know my kids….I remember that thiose insights are *why* I’m their mom. And thank goodness.

  2. Thank you Lisa. We all have those stories of the terrible things people have said to us, this is a good reminder to remember the good things. It is those things that can give us strength when we are feeling low. Also, I believe each of us have opportunities to be that voice for others. We can choose to be the positive voice or that critical voice. We can “Be the change” as Gandhi said.

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