I only forget the little things. More or less.

“Oh, no!” I groaned inwardly.  “I can’t believe I forgot this again.”  The dentist’s office had just called to let me know that I was supposed to be there for my appointment.  I had intended to go, I’d even mentally reminded myself the day before.  But my son refused to get on the van for school that morning and it had been another horrible morning.  Until they called, the appointment had vanished from my mind.

This happened quite a few times when I was parenting during the really tough times.  While I forgot my own appointments from time to time, I was religious about taking my son to see his therapist and psychiatrist.  We were late a few times, but didn’t miss even one.  I might forget to pick up my allergy medication, but never forgot to get his prescriptions. I missed haircuts, the dentist and even vet appointments for my dog.  I would kick myself mentally and do better for a while.  Then my son would get worse and I’d forget once again.

One time, when my son was about six months old, I stubbed my toe and began to fall while carrying him outdoors.  I was walking on our scorching hot driveway in July and I frantically twisted my body so I would take the brunt of the fall. I crashed down but held him aloft the entire time.  I ended up with a badly scraped leg and elbow but he was just fine.  Forgetting my appointments but never his, was a version of this.  Keeping him safe, getting what he needed was the top priority.  Sometimes it was the only priority.

One day I came across an article about stressful life events which mentioned a stress inventory test.  Any article that had the word “stress” in the title drew my eye immediately.  According to the test, events that caused major stress included the death of someone close to you, going to jail or getting a divorce.  I also noticed that high stress events included happy things such as marriage or pregnancy.  Experiencing many stressful events resulted in a high score and a high score meant you were at risk for stress-related health problems.  Although parenting a child with mental health needs isn’t specifically on the list, items like change in financial state (check), increase in arguments about child raising (check) and change in health/behavior of a family member (double check) certainly are.  What happens, I wondered, when you get a really high score year after year after year?

Parents of children with mental health needs have a dark sense of humor and this become one of my go-to jokes.  “My stress points must have hit 1000 and it’s only March,” I’d say, or, “I’d like to get some points for a happy event this month.” A few times, I’d jokingly tell a friend that I was getting close to setting a record for stress points and I sure hoped I’d receive a great vacation instead of getting sick.  Neither happened.

However, I did get small, strange physical symptoms of stress.  A few times, I woke with my upper lip swollen like I had been stung by a bee.  It would usually go away by the next day. Another time or two, my eyelid would twitch on and off all day.  I was sure everyone else could see these strange twitches and swellings but for the most part no one really noticed.  I learned, however, to pay attention. If I didn’t, they came more often or lasted longer.

Caregiver burnout is when the stress of caregiving results in physical, emotional or mental exhaustion. But this catchy term doesn’t begin to describe the impact of raising a child with mental health needs.  Partly, it’s the unpredictability.  Each new medication might work a little, a lot or not at all.  Even worse, your child might have miserable side effects.  A new therapist might not click, might last only a short time or be wonderful.  Same with school programs, treatment protocols and hospitalizations.  Or even several of these things at once.  And, just when you think you have a thing or two under your belt, you find yourself with a new cast of providers, a new diagnosis or new behaviors you’ve never seen before.  You rarely reach a state of equilibrium.

Weddings, births, work changes and even mourning a death have different rituals attached to them to help you understand what’s happening and what to expect next. They may be stressful, but others have gone through this and tell you what to do and what to avoid.  For most of us parenting a child with mental health needs, there’s no marked trail.  If this were an item on the stress inventory test, it should be right up there with a weighty number of points.  It certainly had an impact on my memory and me.

Tags: , , , ,

1 thought on “I only forget the little things. More or less.

  1. Lisa, were you listening to a conversation I had yesterday with two people I value their opinions quite a lot. I don’t dare take the test right now as I know I will get at least a 100! Not the test you want to get a 100 on. Just before I read your blog I thought huh J has his hair cut often and mine hasn’t been cut in a year. Too busy on the phone making sure everything in his life is on point. The one thing I don’t miss are my doctors appointments because I have to stay alive to keep him safe.
    Thanks for the reminder that we need to put our oxygen mask on first.

Comments are closed.