Is hope a difference maker or something we give lip service to?

It was one more meeting where I described my young son’s extreme moods.  It shouldn’t stand out in my memory, but it does. It was a tedious meeting in a way, telling his story and mine one more time.  Yet, I was comfortable, too, painting a picture of his days, some wild and hyper-charged, others filled with pain and darkness.  This was a familiar task for me at meetings, at intakes and when someone new was providing care.  It was an emotional landscape I knew very well.

On the ride home, I thought about his moods, which were often two (or more) wild and crazy extremes.  I had a moment of clarity when I realized that part of my comfort was that our lives – his brother’s life and mine — had those same extremes.  We rocketed from periods of hope and expectancy to times of despair and darkness. Sometimes they mirrored my older son’s trajectory, but not always.  Describing my son’s swinging moods was the same as portraying our roller coaster home life.

I’ve thought a lot about hope and darkness, two emotional states we lived with over many years, so that it felt sometimes like they were additional family members.  Sometimes the jump from one to another was abrupt, like someone came and changed the paint on the walls from stormy gray to sunny yellow overnight.  Other times, it was like a dimmer switch that was slowly moved from low to bright light.  Some days my son would emerge from hours-long, pain-filled crying along with waves of outbursts and I’d see in his eyes that he was back.  He was lost and had re-emerged.  Those days I’d feel a flare of hope. My mood mirrored his.  Other times, my feelings of hope or darkness had less to do with him than my own feelings of passion or inadequacy, determination or exhaustion.

Hope and darkness were regular companions for me for a long while, just as they are for many parents raising children like my son.  We require ourselves to act calmly, firmly, knowledgeably or passionately around our volatile children and at meetings when we ask for help.  Sometimes we actually feel that way, though many times we fake it.  Inside, we are nurturing hope or battling dark thoughts.

Hope is a funny thing.  We talk about it a lot in the children’s mental health world and sometimes it’s even written into care plans. We don’t teach people how to nurture it or grow it, however.  We don’t recognize it and remark on it in others or ourselves very often.  We don’t reward it or know very much about strengthening it.  Often people believe it’s the child who needs hope, when their parent needs it just as much.

Hope is not reciting platitudes such as ‘everything will turn out for the best.’  It’s not little sayings or making wishes.   It’s something much more durable.   Chris Hedges, American journalist, writes, “Hope is not comfortable or easy. Hope requires personal risk. It is not about the right attitude. Hope is not about peace of mind. Hope is action. Hope is doing something.” For me, hope is made stronger by a sense of expectancy.  Not expectations, which regularly got blown up, but a feeling that something positive and satisfying might happen. And then doing something, even a small thing, to move life in that direction.

Parents are pragmatic people.  Our hope is anchored in real things, even if they only occur in small doses.  I pinned my hope on concrete things like the doctor saying his brain would change at age 14, letting him observe himself and be able to use those observations to participate in his own care.  I felt hope when I heard about the pipeline of medications that would be available in a few months or a year, when we’d exhausted all our options.  I was hopeful when I discovered programs or ideas to help my younger son, whose needs were just as important.

When those things actually happened my hope stayed steady for a while, chasing off the dark thoughts.  Sometimes I carried the embers of hope for all us, my sons and me.  I would see that spark of expectancy in my son’s eyes when he found something to look forward to and never want it to dim.   That was his hope joining with mine.

I got hope from other parents, too.  Parents ahead of me on their parenting journey, who had weathered emotional tsunamis and earthquakes. I heard how they got through it. They offered me ideas and strategies as well as laughter and understanding. They were parents who had figured out a way to grow hope.  Parents are practical people.  They don’t offer platitudes or empty promises.  They know the value of realistic hope.

Sometimes we are afraid to hope.  Sometimes our hopes are dashed.  But hope is a persistent thing if we let it be.  And we need it.

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1 thought on “Is hope a difference maker or something we give lip service to?

  1. After experiencing the 5 year cancer battle of my daughter (from age 22-27) and her ultimate death, I have come to believe that hope is as essential to human beings as the air we breath. She never lost hope even at the very end until the moments before she died. It is what kept her going and is what sustained her family and friends to support her. I know that my younger son with mental illness needs this same hope, but the world is not as kind, supportive or hope inspiring to him as it was to a beautiful young woman in her early 20’s who was dying.

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