All posts by Lisa Lambert

Our family’s path to recovery from trauma

My children and I are currently in recovery after leaving a domestic violence situation back in 2010.  Both my children and I have PTSD, but we are on the path to recovery.  Both of my children also have high functioning autism, complicating treatment and their recovery.   It has been a long haul to get where we are today.  Not all of the treatment that we have received was helpful or effective.  The biggest thing that has helped us is knowing that we have friends and family that care about us.  I am sharing our story because what has helped us may help others.

When I initially left my ex-husband we were extremely isolated, and that made it difficult to leave and heal.  I am originally from the North Shore, and my ex moved us to Lowell, which isolated me.  I didn’t know anyone in the area.  Luckily, we found a program that allowed their social workers to visit me frequently.  They provided the support that I needed to push me to follow through with leaving my situation.  This experience has taught me that we truly need the support of others  There are some things that we cannot do completely alone.  Raising children is one of them.  It really does take a village.

After leaving my ex, my family immediately started therapy with a big agency in Lowell.  This agency taught me how to restrain my children, triggering them in the office to have me practice restraint.  I now know this was a completely inappropriate thing to do.  Restraint should always be a last resort.  This agency, like many in the Lowell area, has a very high turnover of staff.  They also overmedicated me.  I luckily had a friend point this out to me.  Snowing me with medication was not a good solution, and it slowed my recovery.

For me to move forward, I needed to feel the pain I was feeling and move through it.  Taking a pill for depression and anxiety is not a fix.  Sometimes medication is needed, but overmedicating patients isn’t acceptable. Patients who live with anxiety and depression and/or who are recovering from trauma need to develop skills and foster their strengths to function fully.

I am very fortunate to have a circle of friends who care deeply about us.  One of my closest friends is a social worker who pointed me in the direction of Dr. Ross Greene’s, Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS).  I changed from a traditional consequence-based way of disciplining my children to listening to them, and looking at why they behave the way they do.  With this approach, I have been able to help them develop skills.   Attachment Regulation and Competency (ARC) is a trauma informed treatment approach (similar to CPS) that is beginning to be implemented in the Lowell area.  When working with children with mental health and behavior issues it is important to focus on building their skills and self-esteem.

My family continues to work on managing emotions.  We have had to work on accepting that sometimes emotions are not fun.  The zones of regulation have been helpful for teaching my children to identify what they are feeling and assess what they can do to calm themselves down.

There have been times when I have thought I couldn’t manage the job I was given, parenting two high needs kiddos.  When one of my children was younger, they had a habit of running off, and both children had explosive outbursts.   There have been very challenging moments where my friends and community support have been all that has gotten me through.

There was a time that I thought my history of depression made a less qualified parent.   I realize now that my own trauma history and my struggle with depression make me the best qualified person to raise my children.  No one else will love them, empathize with them, or fight for them the way that I do.   I luckily was reminded that the one thing that correlates with children recovering from trauma is their having one constant person who loves them.

There are times that all we can do as parents is put one foot in front of the other, slowly pushing forward.  We need to cut ourselves some slack and accept that we are not going to be perfect.  All we can do is our best.  We can learn from our own trauma experiences and give our children the best life we can!

Christle Roberts is the mother of two children with complicated needs.  When she is not parenting, she loves to crochet, knit, cook, and teach English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL).   She hopes that sharing her story will help other parents who are raising high needs children.  

seacoast scene

I Am Not My Mental Illness, And Neither Are You

seacoast sceneI am most certainly not my mental illnesses.

Although I have ADHD, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, PTSD, and most likely an upcoming OCD diagnosis, I am not defined by those labels.

I am a lover of poetry. I get lost in the words I write, pouring the bottled up emotion onto paper, and making it sound like a symphony. I love to sing, love to hear music flow through my headphones, a form of escape sometimes, and other times indulging in sadness.

I am empathetic. I love to help other people. It’s what I know I was born to do. I am an advocate. I have advocated locally, statewide, and nationally, and it’s all a result of my burning passion for being a voice. I am a voice for those who have a hard time speaking out, for those who are growing tired of being treated like they don’t belong.

When I tell people I have a mental illness, it is an immediate judgement when that person doesn’t know what it is like to feel like there is no hope. Sometimes, hope seems so far away. It feels like I will never earn the right to be happy. However, there is strength within me. So when I feel like I don’t belong, I tell myself there must be a reason I’m still here. I think that reason is to pursue a better future, both for myself and others.

So yes, I am not my mental illness. No one is defined only by their mental illness. We are all warriors. We fight this battle bravely every day. We are not just “patients”, we are people who need our voices heard, for there is so much to be said.

By: Rachel LaBrie

 

Alternative facts, fake truths and mental health: are you kidding me?

When my son was 8 years old, his psychiatrist taught me to say, “My eyes don’t see that, honey.”   I said it when he confused his imagination and reality.  I said it when he wasn’t sure what was real.  I said it when he needed to know what was rock solid actuality and what was not.

His uncertainty about what was real had begun when he was in preschool.  Some days I would pick him up and he’d ask me to sing a song we had learned together in preschool class.  I’d say, “I wasn’t there, remember?”  He’d think for a minute, and sometimes he’d agree.  But not always.  It was cute but also a little worrisome in its frequency and his intensity about it.  It didn’t go away as he got older.  It simply changed into different forms.

He would insist that he personally knew characters in cartoons or on television.  He was quite sure he had lived events he’d only heard about.  Then came the day when the numbers on his math paper turned into piranhas swimming on the page.  It terrified him so much, he couldn’t touch the desk. He was eight.

He was a little boy with a big, scary mental health problem.  Sometimes the doctors said it was psychosis, sometimes they said it was mania.  Some even said he had a vivid imagination, but they stopped saying that after a few months.

He needed the people he trusted to say that, “No, there is no monster with one eye looking at us. That must be your eyes seeing things I don’t see.”  He needed people he loved to say, “That villain in the movie did not appear in the living room.”  Instead, I said that the villain was not allowed to leave the movie screen. He needed certainty and unshakable facts.  Without them, his fear and anxiety paralyzed or incapacitated him.

I never knew when a fact had to be verified for him and verified in the exact same way.  But I got good at it, keeping it simple with no embellishments.  I got good at telling him that the truth was the truth just as moms everywhere do.  Except we weren’t talking about little white lies that a child might tell, we were talking about something far more important.  He needed my certainty to become his so he could trust his world that day.  We all got on the same page on this, his teachers, his therapist, his doctor and his family. Without that, his anxiety zoomed to the stratosphere.

Not long ago, I saw someone I know on a national television show.  She has a brother with schizophrenia and yet she talked about alternative facts as if they were a thing.  A real live, acceptable, incontrovertible thing.  I looked at the television screen dumbfounded.  Yet, it’s easy to let terms like “alternative facts” or “fake” or “fake news” slip by us with an eye roll or shake of the head.  Or let them weasel their way into our vocabulary, like the person I saw on television.

Parents of children with emotional and mental health issues live with uncertainty and ambiguity every day.  We don’t know when our child opens his eyes in the morning how the day will go.  We don’t know if this service will actually work or that treatment will make a real difference.  We chafe against this kind of uncertainty but we learn to accept it (mostly) as part of our everyday life.

But we need all the knowledge, statistics and facts we can get. We hang on to them as we build our new normal.  We learn to discern true expertise and, when we find it, we are thrilled by it.  We might not always agree with it, but we respect it and are glad it’s there.  We don’t heap scorn or contempt on it as if it’s ‘only’ someone’s opinion, say about climate change or the value of a work of art.  We know that expertise is a close cousin to facts, yet not quite the same since it has the expert’s perspective woven into it.  That’s okay since we have our point of view too.

I’ve always been a huge believer in telling the truth even when it’s hard, inconvenient or unpopular. After my son began having problems I realized his mental health and his ability to trust depended mightily on it.  I also came to understand that my expertise was built on a combination of hard won knowledge and experience. There is a lot of value in both my expertise and the experts we rely on to provide care.

Truth is not negotiable for me or my son.  It shouldn’t be negotiable for any of us.  There isn’t any alternative.

Start a revolution, stop hating your body

Body Image: 3 Years Later

Start a revolution, stop hating your bodyMy name is Rachel LaBrie, and I wrote a blog about my struggle with my body image for PPAL three years ago. In that blog, I realize I sugarcoated a lot of things. Let me tell you the truth. Well, the full truth.

I have bulimia, and have since I was seven years old. It all started in dance class. The constant pressure to be long and lean took a serious toll on my mental health, and then my physical health. I started off hiding in the back of the room, so that not as many peers could see me. That transitioned to me emotionally eating whenever I’d get anxious. And as the guilt set in, that’s when the purging started.

I’ve been told seven years old is so young to form an eating disorder, but you’d be surprised. I’ve hated how I looked since I was 5 years old. It’s also a super common thing to have an eating disorder as a dancer.

I probably read how to purge in a book; I was an avid reader, and I often read books meant for teenagers. I never told anyone until I was 9, and it was my nutritionist, who didn’t believe me about my bulimia. My dance teacher continued to ignore the signs. So I did what I thought would stop all that…I quit dance.

However, the behavior was already developed and I just got more and more lost in my disorder. The Eating Disorder “Voice” kept telling me to eat. Chocolate, cookies, candy, whatever I could get my hands on. Then all of a sudden, “STOP!! GET RID OF IT! GET RID OF IT ALL!!” It yelled a lot.

I gave in for so long. I followed my eating disorder into fire until I felt I was igniting into flames.  That is until I hit a breaking point. I finally told my Primary Care Doctor, and she referred me to an outpatient eating disorder clinic. I did the Partial Hospitalization Program twice in 6 months.

It really did help. I haven’t purged in about 9 months. I feel better physically, but the “voice” still comes into my head from time to time. I’ve learned some techniques to shut it up.

It’s still hard. I still hate my body. I still insult it more than I should. But I recognize it does so much for me. It carries me around, lets me accomplish my goals. I need to thank my body more often for what it is, instead of criticizing it for what it isn’t. And maybe that time will come soon.

For everyone who has struggled with their own body image, I stand with you. I understand how hard it is to make that negativity in your head stay quiet. But we can do this.

Say something nice about your body to your body today. The littlest compliments help. It seems silly, but sometimes you need to convince yourself and your body that your body is worthy of love from you. I let my body become my enemy, but now, I feel like we are building a friendship. And I cannot even begin to tell you how good that feels.

Here’s to another 3 years of growth.

By: Rachel LaBrie

 

Don’t call me an enabler. Or anything like it.

Let’s talk about enabling.  Or rather, let’s talk about being accused of it. Happens quite often to parents like me.

The first time I ever heard the word “enabler,” and later its sister words co-dependent and over-controlling, was early in my son’s mental health journey.  He was doing progressively worse each day, exploding over minor things, threatening to hurt himself daily and I went looking for support and help.  I made a long series of calls and finally got what I thought was a sympathetic and wise person on the phone.  She listened, asked a few questions, then pronounced that I was an enabler.

My son was 7 years and, as it turns out, about to have his first psychiatric hospitalization. What I needed was help, not a label.

It also turns out that she knew diddly squat.  It took me a while to figure that out.  I took that word out and turned it over and over and even shook it a few times to see if it would change into something else. It didn’t.  It stuck in my mind, adding to my doubt in those dark moments when I wondered if I could parent my son with his enormous needs.  It undermined my pleasure when I found a moment, all too rare, when I sat with my son and we both enjoyed the moment, the hour or the afternoon.

About a year later, I found a group of parents who all had children like mine.  Some had teenagers (and their stories scared me), some had girls, some were strict and some weren’t.  At a meeting, I told my story of the phone calls and being called an enabler.  They laughed, they scoffed and they said it had happened to them as well. I felt a weight lift and some of the guilt leave.  I wasn’t ready to laugh along with them though.  The woman on the phone had been so certain.

What I had started to do from the very beginning was use a mashup of techniques that actually work for those of us trying to parent a really challenging child.  I was letting behaviors go that weren’t absolutely necessary to deal with right then and there. I was trying in a thousand ways to accept and support a son who the world was rejecting when they saw him in his bad moments.  I was adjusting to our new normal. The lady on the phone asked me what I did when my son had meltdowns and I told her I was letting the unimportant go and accepting my son no matter how he behaved.

When you parent a child with mental health needs, you are very focused on finding what works for your child.  You can’t afford a lot of trial and error and it may look controlling when you say no to things you’ve tried before or you just know are unlikely to work.  You also learn how to manage the details.  My son would have a meltdown if we walked through a store with images of zombies or monsters on t-shirts, DVD covers or books so we got good at avoiding those sections.  Sometimes his younger brother would walk 10 steps ahead and turn over the images so we could only see the backs of those items.  Yep, you bet we controlled the environment and even where he walked sometimes.  We made it easier on him, but also on us.

Enabling is described as excusing, justifying, ignoring and smoothing things over for a person who is addicted, has a mental illness, has out of control gambling and so on.  The enabler thinks things like, “If only I can keep this person going through their current crisis, it will buy us another day.” If I had been asked if that definition or self-talk fit, I would have raised my hand in a heartbeat.

When I stopped talking (much) about the details of my son’s life to people who didn’t know us, or had little expertise in children’s mental health, I stopped hearing words like enabler. The therapists, psychiatrists and special education teachers who had experience with mental health issues in children simply got it.  They were using the same techniques I was and comparing notes with me.  My hard won knowledge and experience in what works were seen as just that – expertise.

I’m pretty sure, however, if I looked at the notes from the early IEP meetings or therapy visits, I’d see a word like enabler in there somewhere.  And that’s the problem.  Those words get put in the notes and the next person sees them and maybe wonders or believes it to be true. One casual observation from someone who has a little knowledge and more judgy-ness can have an outsized impact.  So, please don’t call me an enabler.  You’ve got that wrong.