Tag Archives: hope

Is hope a difference maker or something we give lip service to?

July 22nd, 2019

It was one more meeting where I described my young son’s extreme moods.  It shouldn’t stand out in my memory, but it does. It was a tedious meeting in a way, telling his story and mine one more time.  Yet, I was comfortable, too, painting a picture of his days, some wild and hyper-charged, others filled with pain and darkness.  This was a familiar task for me at meetings, at intakes and when someone new was providing care.  It was an emotional landscape I knew very well.

On the ride home, I thought about his moods, which were often two (or more) wild and crazy extremes.  I had a moment of clarity when I realized that part of my comfort was that our lives – his brother’s life and mine — had those same extremes.  We rocketed from periods of hope and expectancy to times of despair and darkness. Sometimes they mirrored my older son’s trajectory, but not always.  Describing my son’s swinging moods was the same as portraying our roller coaster home life.

I’ve thought a lot about hope and darkness, two emotional states we lived with over many years, so that it felt sometimes like they were additional family members.  Sometimes the jump from one to another was abrupt, like someone came and changed the paint on the walls from stormy gray to sunny yellow overnight.  Other times, it was like a dimmer switch that was slowly moved from low to bright light.  Some days my son would emerge from hours-long, pain-filled crying along with waves of outbursts and I’d see in his eyes that he was back.  He was lost and had re-emerged.  Those days I’d feel a flare of hope. My mood mirrored his.  Other times, my feelings of hope or darkness had less to do with him than my own feelings of passion or inadequacy, determination or exhaustion.

Hope and darkness were regular companions for me for a long while, just as they are for many parents raising children like my son.  We require ourselves to act calmly, firmly, knowledgeably or passionately around our volatile children and at meetings when we ask for help.  Sometimes we actually feel that way, though many times we fake it.  Inside, we are nurturing hope or battling dark thoughts.

Hope is a funny thing.  We talk about it a lot in the children’s mental health world and sometimes it’s even written into care plans. We don’t teach people how to nurture it or grow it, however.  We don’t recognize it and remark on it in others or ourselves very often.  We don’t reward it or know very much about strengthening it.  Often people believe it’s the child who needs hope, when their parent needs it just as much.

Hope is not reciting platitudes such as ‘everything will turn out for the best.’  It’s not little sayings or making wishes.   It’s something much more durable.   Chris Hedges, American journalist, writes, “Hope is not comfortable or easy. Hope requires personal risk. It is not about the right attitude. Hope is not about peace of mind. Hope is action. Hope is doing something.” For me, hope is made stronger by a sense of expectancy.  Not expectations, which regularly got blown up, but a feeling that something positive and satisfying might happen. And then doing something, even a small thing, to move life in that direction.

Parents are pragmatic people.  Our hope is anchored in real things, even if they only occur in small doses.  I pinned my hope on concrete things like the doctor saying his brain would change at age 14, letting him observe himself and be able to use those observations to participate in his own care.  I felt hope when I heard about the pipeline of medications that would be available in a few months or a year, when we’d exhausted all our options.  I was hopeful when I discovered programs or ideas to help my younger son, whose needs were just as important.

When those things actually happened my hope stayed steady for a while, chasing off the dark thoughts.  Sometimes I carried the embers of hope for all us, my sons and me.  I would see that spark of expectancy in my son’s eyes when he found something to look forward to and never want it to dim.   That was his hope joining with mine.

I got hope from other parents, too.  Parents ahead of me on their parenting journey, who had weathered emotional tsunamis and earthquakes. I heard how they got through it. They offered me ideas and strategies as well as laughter and understanding. They were parents who had figured out a way to grow hope.  Parents are practical people.  They don’t offer platitudes or empty promises.  They know the value of realistic hope.

Sometimes we are afraid to hope.  Sometimes our hopes are dashed.  But hope is a persistent thing if we let it be.  And we need it.

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Why hope will never be silent

April 10th, 2017

Harvey Milk once said “Hope will never be silent.” That quote has been an essential quote for me since the ninth grade.   As long as we keep hope in our hearts, we can never be silenced, and we can prevail.

This quote means so much due to the relevance to what I want to accomplish in my life and my future career path. This quote is also relevant to the world we live in today, and to all of the people advocating for the rights they deserve. Hope plays a huge part in our society, and we can’t just give up on the concept. If we all simply gave up hope, what would we have left? We would have total destruction, and tears in the eyes of the ones we love the most. We’d have a complete lack of progress, and more pain than we could ever begin to handle.

When I think of the word “hope” and all of the people I know who embody it, I also think of the word “fighter.” Fighters not only have hope in their heart, but they advocate for the causes they truly believe in, and fight against the things that take away from their cause. I like to hold the belief that I am a fighter. I’ve been through my fair share of tough times and challenges in my life, but in total honesty, I simply want to use my lived experience to help those who are going through similar struggles in their lives. No one should have to fight these demons alone, and that is why I want to be involved in the mental health field,

Trying to stay positive is a hard thing to do, but I really try to do just that. Even if at times staying positive seems impossible, it is vital because all negativity does is drag us down. For me, my friends play a huge part in my positivity. Almost all of my friends have been diagnosed with a mental health “disorder.” I put quotes around disorder because although these are not “normal” for a brain, they still play a part in who we are, even though that’s not all there is to it. The people who have taught me the most about hope are the ones who have these disorders. They’ve taught me about resilience.

I know in my heart that I am the fighter I am because of the friends I have gotten the pleasure of knowing. I not only fight for myself, but I fight for all of the people I love who have taught me that everyone has something to say. Sometimes they simply need help to say it. Giving everyone the chance to speak up on issues they believe in is important. Listen to the hopes and dreams of others, because hope is vital to societal growth.

No matter how grim a situation may seem, you can find hope not only within yourself, but in others as well. No one is incapable of having hope in their soul. Sometimes they just need a helping hand to guide them. So, in honor of Harvey Milk, remember “Hope will never be silent” and we as a human race can never be silenced.

Rachel LaBrie is our guest blogger. Rachel dreams of being a young adult fiction writer. She currently has 6 animals who she truly adores. 

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Hope for the Future

October 23rd, 2014

RedUmbrWhen I look deep down inside, I find myself somewhat of a pessimist. Not just any pessimist though, an anxious pessimist. Anxiety girl, able to jump to the worst conclusion in a single bound. I usually don’t watch the news, because I don’t want to hear about how the world outside my own head is messed up. When there are issues inside my head, it’s just that. Inside my head. My problem. When there is a war overseas, an oil spill, or a school shooting, it’s the world that’s messed up, and that’s not something any amount of meddling on my part can fix.  That’s the secret to life, though. Don’t meddle in outside affairs. Find your circle of friends, or even just acquaintances, who you can work with together to make each of your lives’ better.

Last semester I was in a program called “The Art of Leadership.” In this program, I got to spend Wednesday nights with fourteen other student leaders from campus. We did things like take personality tests, learn about ethics, and were taught to use our leadership styles to better ourselves. And, to my surprise, after two weeks my outlook on this world that we all live in brightened. Because this was the room on campus with fifteen people who were most likely to actually change the world. And, one week later, I came to the realization that I was one of those people. I can change the world.

Since that realization, I have seen around me the ways that we can all change the world in a little way. Every time someone smiles at me, my world is a better place to be. It is also better when someone compliments me on something. Anything. So, now it is my goal to change the world for one person a day. I interact with people at school, at work, at the coffee shop, and even on the bus.

When I get down and begin to believe that I am just one person, that I am shy and that there is no way that I could possibly make anyone better, I fight back with a mantra:

From the beginning I’ve always been shy
But I knew that someday I’d learn to fly
As days go on and events unfold
I know I’ll someday change the world.

And, even if I’m the only person like this, I still will leave a legacy. I will change the world. There is hope for the future.

Patricia Woodbury just graduated from college. She is currently living in central Massachusetts and is still writing.

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