Tag Archives: mood disorder

Looking at the eyes while parenting

February 15th, 2019

When my son was born, the nurse in the hospital told me he was an old soul.  She could tell, she said, just by looking in his eyes.  My mother backed her up.  She said she could see all the wisdom and acceptance he was born with and wasn’t it a shame that he would lose that as he got older.  All babies have this pure, precious gaze she noted.  Me, I just cherished those moments when I was holding him and he would look deep into my eyes, absorbing me, letting me absorb him.

Fast forward to elementary school.  By the time my son was seven, I was talking about his eyes in a very different way.  I told his therapist that his eyes changed when he was having a meltdown.  That it was as if a different child was looking out, one I often couldn’t reach.  When he would have panic attacks, fly into rages or harm himself, his eyes would change before, during and for little while after.  I watched his eyes to predict how intense it would be and whether I had a chance of averting what was coming.  Sometimes, though not often, I did.  And when things had returned to normal, the look in his eyes did, too.

The eyes don’t lie.

Later there were mornings when I’d wake him for school and when his eyes opened, I’d just know.  In some ways, they looked like his mischievous toddler eyes, sparkling when he was about to be silly. There was a light to his eyes, but it wasn’t always innocent.  He would want to take chances or ignore danger.  He would charm people into breaking the rules for him.  Sometimes, he seemed like a ticking bomb or a piece of fragile crystal.  I could tell by his eyes to handle him with care.

Then there were the times when he wasn’t wild, just angry and hurt.  Not a normal anger rather, a rage that burned out of control, tantrums that lasted for up to two hours or more.  Not just a normal hurt instead, the kind where, as he used to say, “I want it to hurt as much on the outside as I do on the inside.”  His eyes didn’t sparkle, they were flatter, darker and sometimes cruel. He might say awful things to me, he might be destructive.  More than once, I would watch a room get dismantled – chairs overturned, sofa cushions thrown across the room and anything small enough hurtled through space.

Then he would come back to himself and his eyes would be his own.  They would soften, they would be clear and they would provide a connection instead of a wall or shield.

I thought I was alone in this.  Then one mom told me how her son’s eyes would change and it was as if he vanished somewhere.  “It’s like I’ve lost my child,” she told me.  “When that happens I am always on my guard because I don’t know what he’ll do.”  Not long after another parent echoed this saying, “I always watch her eyes. When they begin to change, I brace myself.”

Julie A. Fast, author of “Loving Someone with Bipolar Disorder” writes about this phenomenon for BP Hope.   She writes that depression and mania both profoundly affect the entire eye, from lids to lashes.  She has observed that there are three clues to recognizing mania in the eyes. (My own guess is that parents, who are the supreme experts on their children, observe many of these changes when their child’s mood shifts, even if no one has clinically named it mania.)

Clue #1 is when you see sparkling eyes, maybe even with shimmering flecks in them so they light up.  This was the look my son had when his eyes would sparkle and he would ignore signs of danger.  On one school field trip he said he could walk across a busy Boston street and be unharmed because the cars would simply avoid him. We had to hold on tight to keep him from testing that theory.

Clue #2 is when you see the eyes become darker and for some, the pupils become wider.  This is what my son’s eyes looked like before he had rages, when he hurt so much he wanted to hurt everyone and everything around him.  It’s when his eyes almost looked mean and flat.

Clue #3 is when you notice the eyes changing shape.  They can widen with euphoria and narrow with suspicion.  The person sometimes doesn’t look like themselves.  You wonder, looking at your child, if it’s really them in there.

Throughout his childhood I was told my son had beautiful eyes with long lashes.  I smiled because I was always pleased to have his strengths noticed, beautiful eyes among them.  But it meant they were observing his eyes, even if it was in a quick glance.  When I was told this, I would always turn my head and focus on his eyes.  When they were his own clear eyes, I’d smile.  But sometimes his eyes were clues.  Those times,  they were the best early warning system I had.

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