Tag Archives: suicide prevention

Suicide as a Human Right: What We Can Do to Support Folks Who Consider Suicide

January 20th, 2020

We live in a world that is inherently traumatizing. There is no life on Earth in which trauma does not exist within. There are people murdered everyday, there are people dying that have no food, fires spreading and killing entire towns of people and wildlife. In a world in which things like this happen multiple times a day, it is impossible for me to blame people who want to kill themselves.

When I say I cannot blame anyone for having the urge to die, or for choosing suicide over living, I am not saying it doesn’t break my heart. I so heavily relate to the feeling that not being alive would be an upgrade from living on this planet.  What I am saying is that suicide is, and should be recognized across the board as, a human right. No one chooses to be brought into this world. Who is to say that we don’t maintain the right to live, or die, on our own terms?

My issue with most “suicide prevention” organizations is that suicide always being an option is not openly spread to folks. What is pushed instead the statement “You don’t want to die, you just want to escape your pain,” which completely negates the fact that for a lot of folks, life is pain. There are many folks who actually want to die, and telling them they don’t simply invalidates their experiences and shuts them off to discussing how they really feel.

What the organizations who push the message of preventing suicide should be saying is something to the tone of “Suicide is always an option, and we should not blame or shame folks who choose to die on their own terms. There is something very powerful, however, about knowing the option is always there, but choosing to live despite.”

No one wants to feel like they cannot escape. A statement I also disagree with spreading is “Everything gets better. Give it time.” That is a dangerous assumption, for unfortunately, lives can and do get worse for some folks. Sometimes escaping abuse, neglect, or your own demons just simply doesn’t happen, and it is unfair to tell people that they don’t have the power and the option to leave.

I’ve lost two of my best friends to suicide. Both under the age of 22. And as much as it hurts me that they are gone, and I miss them every day, I cannot get behind making people stay alive for the comfort of others around them. People say “you have so many people who love you” but when you grow up in environments in which it is ingrained in you that you shouldn’t love yourself, it makes life very difficult. I tell people often I want to stop living for others and start living for myself, but as someone who has endured lifelong trauma and degradation, it is still such a challenge to even like myself.

I’ve been fighting hard to love myself, and to put myself first. I know so many other people who are too. Since we live in a society in which, the vast, vast majority of folks have been taught that they are not good enough, through actions and through words, it is hard sometimes to believe anyone can love themselves.

Trauma is a human trait in which all of us have a piece (or 5) of. Instead of shaming folks for leaving, a better idea, a healthier idea, is to acknowledge trauma as a uniting force, and well as a systematic failure within all systems that need to be broken down and rebuilt.

 

Maxxwell LaBrie (pronouns: they/them/theirs) is a young adult whose passion for peer advocacy and youth voice fuels their dedication to writing. They are a psychiatric survivor and a certified peer specialist who thrives to support young adults in all avenues and through any struggle they face. They also serve on the Youth MOVE National Board of Directors.

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